Soil Properties and Multi-Pollution Affect Taxonomic and Functional Bacterial Diversity in a Range of French Soils Displaying an Anthropisation Gradient

TitleSoil Properties and Multi-Pollution Affect Taxonomic and Functional Bacterial Diversity in a Range of French Soils Displaying an Anthropisation Gradient
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsLemmel F, Maunoury-Danger F, Fanesi A, Leyval C, Cébron A
JournalMicrobial EcologyMicrobial Ecology
Volume77
Pagination993-1013
Date PublishedMay 01
Type of Articlejournal article
ISBN Number1432-184X
Abstract

The intensive industrial activities of the twentieth century have left behind highly contaminated wasteland soils. It is well known that soil parameters and the presence of pollutants shape microbial communities. But in such industrial waste sites, the soil multi-contamination with organic (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH) and metallic (Zn, Pb, Cd) pollutants and long-term exposure may induce a selection pressure on microbial communities that may modify soil functioning. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of long-term multi-contamination and soil characteristics on bacterial taxonomic and functional diversity as related to the carbon cycle. We worked on 10 soils from northeast of France distributed into three groups (low anthropised controls, slag heaps, and settling ponds) based on their physico-chemical properties (texture, C, N) and pollution level. We assessed bacterial taxonomic diversity by 16S rDNA Illumina sequencing, and functional diversity using Biolog® and MicroResp™ microtiter plate tools. Although taxonomic diversity at the phylum level was not different among the soil groups, many operational taxonomic units were influenced by metal or PAH pollution, and by soil texture and total nitrogen content. Functional diversity was not influenced by PAH contamination while metal pollution selected microbial communities with reduced metabolic functional diversity but more tolerant to zinc. Limited microbial utilisation of carbon substrates in metal-polluted soils was mainly due to the nitrogen content. Based on these two observations, we hypothesised that reduced microbial activity and lower carbon cycle–related functional diversity may have contributed to the accumulation of organic matter in the soils that exhibited the highest levels of metal pollution.

Short TitleMicrob Ecol